JAPACS

Previous Texxts

TEXXT 1:

Pay to the Order of Puerto Rico

By Alexander Odishelidze and Arthur Laffer

(Complete work below in “Must Axxess Files” box.)

CHAPTER 2: The Last Colony

The asterisk next to the name of Roger Maris may be the most famous punctuation mark in modern history. Until recent times, when the great Yankee slugger’s name was superseded by those of McGwire, Sosa, and, finally, Bonds, the renowned asterisk in the baseball record book informed the reader to look more deeply. At the bottom of the page the reader would find the truth that Maris had hit his 61 home runs in a season that was eight games longer than the one that produced the Babe’s legendary 60. Used this way, the asterisk meant, “More explanation needed.”

In the year 2003, the name of the island territory nearly 1,000 miles to the southeast of the United States should always be written Puerto Rico*. Here, in this chain of islands spreading like a necklace of seashells from the Yucatan Channel to the tip of Venezuela, Puerto Rico is the ultimate anomaly, a place where things cannot be understood at a first, a second, or even a third glance. The economy, the form of democracy, the position in the Hemisphere. The past, the present, the future. Mark them all with an asterisk. More explanation is needed.

At the end of the warm, wet summer of 2003, the Robert Clemente Arena in San Juan, Puerto Rico, was filled to the rafters. Mark it with an asterisk. It was a merely a basketball game between two teams of American citizens. One was composed entirely of professionals representing the mainland United States. The opposition was composed of both professionals and amateurs, representing an unincorporated territory of the United States only 3,515 square miles in size, no bigger than the Los Angeles basin. But it was the mainland players who were looking for payback. More explanation needed.

[READ MORE]

TEXXT 2:

Puerto Rico’s Casualties in the Korean War

Note: With the news that the U.S. Senate chose to punt on the status issue, again stopping four million American citizens from casting a vote to end their inequality and second-class citizenship, we at LA CHULETA CONGELÁ  have decided to publish the names of those who have fought and died defending what the U.S. Senate unjustly denied the Americans of Puerto Rico: democratic principles and self-determination. Here is how Korea treated some of Puerto Rico’s bravest.

U.S. MILITARY PERSONNEL FROM PUERTO RICO WHO DIED FROM HOSTILE ACTION, INCLUDING MISSING AND CAPTURED IN THE KOREAN WAR, 1950-1957.

LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY NAME

ABREU GARCIA, ROBER; PVT ARMY, 18 JUL 1952; KILLED IN ACTION.
ACEVEDO CRUZ, NICOLAS; PFC ARMY, JUN 1951; KILLED IN ACTION.
ACEVEDO, ISAAC; CPL ARMY, 18 SEP 1952; DIED WHILE MISSING.
ACEVEDO TIRADO, JUAN; PFC ARMY, 24 OCT 1952; DIED OF WOUNDS.
ACOSTA, FRANCISCO; CPL ARMY, 28 JAN 1952; KILLED IN ACTION.
ACOSTA GARCIA, JAIME; 2LT ARMY, 15 JUL 1953; KILLED IN ACTION
ACOSTA MARTINEZ, JOSE; PFC ARMY, 26 APR 1951; KILLED IN ACTION.
ACOSTA MARTINEZ, LUIS; PVT ARMY, 16 SEP 1952; KILLED IN ACTION.
ACOSTA, RUBEN; CPL ARMY, 27 AUG 1951; KILLED IN ACTION.
AGOSTO BERRIOS, ANTONIO; PFC ARMY, 16 JUL 1953; KILLED IN ACTION.
AGUIAR MARQUEZ, ENRIQUE; PVT ARMY, 24 SEP 1952; KILLED IN ACTION.
AGUIRRE, JOSE; M PFC ARMY, 19 MAR 1953; KILLED IN ACTION.
ALBALADEJO, ABRAHAM; CPL ARMY, 19 FEB 1951; KILLED IN ACTION.
ALCAZAR, LUGO; A PFC ARMY, 16 DEC 1950; KILLED IN ACTION.
ALFARO ALFARO, HECTOR; PVT ARMY, 24 SEP 1952; DIED WHILE MISSING.
ALGARIN RODRIGUEZ, ???; PVT ARMY, 24 MAR 1951; KILLED IN ACTION.
ALICEA COTO, LUIS; PFC ARMY, 17 SEP 1952; KILLED IN ACTION.
ALICEA REYES, RAMON; PVT ARMY, 18 OCT 1950; KILLED IN ACTION.
ALICEA, TEODORO; PVT ARMY, 19 AUG 1951; KILLED IN ACTION.

[READ ALL NAMES]

TEXXT 3:

Puerto Rico’s Casualties in the Vietnam War

Note: With the news that the U.S. Senate chose to punt on the status issue, again stopping four million American citizens from casting a vote to end their inequality and second-class citizenship, we at LA CHULETA CONGELÁ  have decided to publish the names of those who have fought and died defending what the U.S. Senate unjustly denied the Americans of Puerto Rico: democratic principles and self-determination. Here is how Vietnam treated some of Puerto Rico’s bravest.

U.S. MILITARY PERSONNEL FROM PUERTO RICO WHO DIED FROM HOSTILE ACTION, INCLUDING MISSING AND CAPTURED IN THE VIETNAM WAR.

LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY NAME

Surname First Names Rank Branch Town
Acevedo Millan Angel Luis SP4 Army Juncos
Acevedo Rechani Rafael MAJ Army Santurce
Acosta Rosario Humberto SSG Army Mayagüez
Alcocer Martinez Hector M. SP4 Army Caguas
Algarin Rivera Rafael Angel SP4 Army Juncos
Alicea Miguel Angel Cruz SFC Army Bayamon
Alicea Serrano David SGT Army Rio Piedras
Alvarado Rivera Jeronimo SSG Army Asomante
Alvarez Buzo Elias SGT Army Ponce
Alvarez Tapia Jose Luis PFC Army Rio Piedras
Andrade Eliseo A. Jr. 1LT Army Villa Piedras
Aranda Santos Eduardo SP4 Army Santurce
Arroyo Baez Gerasimo SFC Army Manuabo
Arroyo Sierra Felix Jr. SGT Army Las Piedras
Aubain Joseph Agustina SP4 Army San Juan

[READ ALL NAMES]

TEXXT 4:

How a Territory Differs from a State

from Statehood for Alaska

by George Sundborg, Sr.

THE TERRITORIAL plan of government was devised for regions under the sovereignty of the United States to which Congress felt itself compelled to allow a measure of self-government, but to which it was unwilling at once to grant full membership in the Union. The status of territory has always been regarded as a sort of governmental adolescence, from which, with increasing population, the area would eventually grow into adult statehood. When a territory has acquired about 60,000 people, it has usually been regarded as of age. Every state west of the Alleghenies, except Texas and California, passed through this stage of development.

COURTS UNCERTAIN WHAT CLAUSE MEANS

Since the whole theory of territorial government was based on the assumption that the period of territorial tutelage would be short, and would be followed by statehood, not too much time or effort was ever expended by Congress in perfecting it. As applied to the continental area, the ill consequences of any imperfections in the territorial system could only be temporary. What is this system, and how well adapted is it to provide government on a more or less permanent basis to such an area as Alaska?

[READ MORE]

 

TEXXT 5:

Pay to the Order of Puerto Rico

By Alexander Odishelidze and Arthur Laffer

(Complete work below in “Must Axxess Files” box.)

Vignette 1: Moncho’s other Family Business

The small boat rocked gently against the dock under the warehouse roof. Moncho and his brother Juanito and their cousin Augustin climbed aboard, pulling the drawstrings of their windbreakers tightly around their waists.

* * * *

Moncho was born and raised in the same town where he lives now, as were his father, his mother, his grandparents and great grandparents, as far back as he can trace his bloodline. He is a respected businessman, a local seafood restaurant owner and fish wholesaler/retailer in a small town on the south coast of Puerto Rico. He lives on the water with his wife and three children, just outside of town, about 500 yards down the road from his restaurant and warehouse. Moncho is successful in his trade, a member of the local Lions Club and also of the local Masonic Temple. He owns a very fast 42-foot sport fishing boat, which he can anchor outside his house or moor inside the warehouse.

Moncho has another trade as well. He uses his boat to pick up bales of cocaine and heroin that have been dropped off some 15 to 20 miles off the southern coast of Puerto Rico by either larger vessels or airplanes from Colombia, Venezuela and Panama.

The boat and a satellite homing device were the key tools of that trade. Moncho would set out in the night with his brother and cousin and they would locate the floating contraband. They would haul it aboard swiftly, rev the engine full, and return home at high speed, with Juanito at the helm and he and Augustin busy on the narrow deck, transferring the bales into suitcases. Once they were home, the suitcases would be packed into boxes and crates, just like the ones he used for supplies and even fish in his restaurant and wholesaling business.

On a typical night, he and his relatives would bring back a load of 500 kilos, more than 1,000 pounds, of cocaine and heroin. The round-trip took little more than four hours, beginning at midnight. By the time they were within the walls of the warehouse and easing up to the dock, the drugs would have been broken down into about 25 suitcases or other travel bags, ready for sealing up. Moncho and Juanito would lift the bags onto the warehouse concrete, next to the restaurant, while Augustin would “take a look around” to make sure no one was taking any special interest in their night fishing trip. Two hours later, the small vans and private cars would begin to pull up to the warehouse. They would pick the boxes, to all appearances the usual product of Moncho’s trade. These vehicles did not attract the attention of the police. They looked like all the other trucks and cars that rolled up to Moncho’s every morning to pick up the previous day’s catch. Each vehicle would take two or three boxes, with one or two suitcases inside. Loading itself did not take long, but the vehicles did not arrive together. That would not look right. They came at intervals, and by noontime all the boxes would be loaded in the six or so vehicles needed for this transaction. [READ MORE]

 


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: